The Prairie Press

Is Your Pet’s Food A Heartbreaker?

If you feed your pet a grain-free diet, home-cooked meals or food with exotic and atypical ingredients, you may want to reconsider. Veterinary cardiologists, nutritionists and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are currently investigating a possible link between those types of diets and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs. DCM can result in abnormal heart rhythms, congestive heart failure and even sudden death. Initially it was thought that those diets might be responsible for a deficiency in taurine, an amino acid essential to heart health in pets. However, most of the pets who have been diagnosed with…

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Do Later Snips Save the Hips?

Controlling the homeless pet population is important to our communities, and at Prairie Animal Health Centre we believe it’s vital to prevent unwanted litters of puppies. However, a growing body of evidence points to some potential health risks of sterilizing your pet too early, especially for larger breed dogs. Two different studies—one at the conducted at the Cornell University College of Veterinary medicine and another at the University of California-Davis—showed that large breed dogs who were spayed and neutered before 12 months of age had an increased risk of hip dysplasia, and an elevated incidence of cranial cruciate ligament (ACL/knee)…

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Ways to Beat the Bloat

You probably know Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV) better by its common name: bloat. It’s a life-threatening emergency in larger dogs resulting from excess gas in the stomach, which causes it to twist upon itself. It’s most common in large-breed, deep chested dogs. But there is something that can be done to prevent it in high-risk pets—gastropexy. This surgical procedure involves surgically attaching the stomach to the wall of the dog’s body, preventing the “twisting” part of GDV. Often when bloat occurs it takes a while for owners to realize their pet is in distress, and this condition becomes fatal…

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Travel Prep for Pets

Got travel plans with your pet? If your itinerary is taking both of you outside Saskatchewan, it’s a good idea to make sure your animal companion is covered for diseases we don’t normally vaccinate for. Heartworm: This potentially fatal, mosquito-borne parasite is present in southern Ontario, southern Quebec, Okanagan in British Columbia and almost every state in the U.S.—particularly in the summer months when mosquitoes are most active. It’s especially prevalent in the southeastern part of the US, and if your travel plans include those regions, you’ll want to get your pet on heartworm preventive well before you depart. Canine…

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Don’t Say Neigh to This Efficient, Life-Saving Vaccine

When it comes to horses, there are five core diseases that can potentially cause death: Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis – 90% Fatal Transmitted through infected mosquitoes, attacks the horse’s nervous system Western Equine Encephalomyelitis – 50% Fatal Like EEE, this disease attacks the nervous system and is transmitted by infected mosquitoes Rabies – 100% Fatal Found throughout the world, transmitted by the bite of an infected animal Tetanus – 75% Fatal Horses are exposed to tetanus bacteria regularly in soil and the disease is transmitted through open wounds, punctures, and surgical incisions. West Nile Virus – 33% Fatal Another mosquito-borne virus…

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February is Dental Health Month!

Dental health disease affects most of the pet population being affected. As much as 90% of pets have dental disease. What does that mean for your pet? That means pet's can gave swollen gums, bleeding gums, loose teeth, infection and pain. There is lots we can do as pet owners to prevent this problem from our affecting our pet's such as; Teeth brushing; this has to be done daily or a t minimum every other day or it is not effective.Dental diets are GREAT!!! As simple as feeding your pet can act as a toothbrush, toothpaste and mouthwash all in…

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